Name: Chris Hummel

Learnings 2 with Chris Hummel

Learnings 2 with Chris Hummel

Tweetables

Life is a mosaic of experiences that zig-zag all over the place #Insights [Click to Tweet]

A career doesn’t always have to be linear. Build up a “portfolio of competencies” #Insights [Click to Tweet]

“How you treat people demonstrates far more about you than it does about those people.” @Hummel_Chris #Insights [Click to Tweet]

Chris Hummel: So when I look at how I impart knowledge to particularly a much younger generation, I start with my daughter. The oldest of my three children is seven years old. I wish she would listen to my advice more. I wish I had better advice to give her.

Chris Hummel: But I really sit down with her and I say, “How you treat other people doesn’t mean you always have to give in; doesn’t mean you always have to listen to peer pressure.” Obviously, as a parent I’m very conscious of peer pressure. But I say, “How you treat people demonstrates far more about you than it does about those people.”

Chris Hummel: And that’s even when you don’t like people. That’s when they do something wrong to you. She’s a great microcosm. She’s just at that age as she’s gone beyond the infantile emotional reaction to everything and she’s now slowly starting to build relationships and look at the way the world goes.

Chris Hummel: And then the second thing I’m trying to do to her is I say, “Build a portfolio.” I don’t quite use these terms to her obviously. But, “Build a portfolio of competencies. Don’t worry so much about your career or that linear progression of what you do. Think about it as a mosaic.”

Chris Hummel: And so a great example is she sings. She sings all the time. She’s singing whether it’s Taylor Swift or whoever. She’s singing all the time.

Chris Hummel: But then she comes and says, “I don’t want to learn the piano anymore.” And I said, “Well, if you want to be a singer, it’s not just about your voice. Are you able to act, to perform? Are you able to understand music so you could play the piano or the guitar? Are you social enough so that you can understand the feedback and feed off that?”

Chris Hummel: And if you take that little microcosm of my little daughter, I guess she can’t be on the American Idol anymore but who wants to grow up and be a singer, how she does that isn’t a linear path. It’s going to be this mosaic of things that zig and zag all over the place. And hopefully as a parent, I can guide her through that.

Chris Hummel: And as a leader, as a friend, I try and do the same thing with my friends, my employees, my peers, bosses to say that same thing, that linear is great. And yes, there’s a part of life that has to be like that. But revel in, marinade in the joy of this mosaic of experience that’s just completely unique.

Chris Hummel: We talked at the beginning Irish-Italian kid from Boston, speaks fluent Russian, with German last name or what not, who else can go and say that? I’m sure there’s somebody out there. I didn’t plan it that way but it just sort of came that way and I’m very happy that it’s taking me to this point. Hopefully, I can help others do the same thing.

Learnings 1 with Chris Hummel

Learnings 1 with Chris Hummel

Tweetables

Toolset & credibility help when starting a #career. Experience and managing complexity help to solidify it #Insights [Click to Tweet]

No graduate degree from @HarvardHBS? No problem. #Insights [Click to Tweet]

Being trained from many different angles helps to create a rounded #management mindset @Hummel_Chris #Insights [Click to Tweet]

Chris Hummel: And I remember very early in my career actually when I was just less than a year out of graduate school. I was doing a consulting job off in Kiev, Ukraine with AT&T in one of their joint ventures over there and I met a boss who said to me, she looked at my profile.  And as I mentioned earlier, I came from an academic, State Department, diplomatic background and I was really worried. I said, “Look. If I try and get in to this business arena, this terrible cut-throat gladiatorial warfare, I didn’t go to Harvard Business School. I didn’t go to Wharton, I didn’t go to Tuck. Am I going to be okay?”

Chris Hummel: And she gave me a great piece of advice that helped me both early in my career and later. And she said, “You will really struggle for the first couple of jobs because you won’t have the tool set. You might have the intellect but you won’t have the actual tool set on how to tackle a lot of these problems you’re going to confront or these challenges or opportunities.”

Chris Hummel: And she said, “And the people from those prestigious business schools, they will have a foundation of tools that they will be able to bring to any situation and they’ll have that credibility of having come from a business school where you will struggle for the first couple of jobs. But once you get to that third job or that fourth job, in particular when you get to management, then you’ll start to wipe the floor with them.” She said, “Because, and not that they’re bad people or your intellect is better but you’ve been trained to think from so many different angles.”

Chris Hummel: So my education was one where we had to look at history, economics, anthropology, finance, law. We had to look at it altogether where it wasn’t down only one discipline and there’s a struggle to be functionally competent which is important. You have to be functionally competent.  But if you can bring all those perspectives together and analyze from a comprehensive point of view, then that’s when particularly you get in this world of ambiguous business problems and challenges and you’re managing people and their personal agendas, and all those kinds of things.

Chris Hummel: That’s when she advised me, I would start to really understand. And she was absolutely right because boy, I struggled at the beginning.  But once I got to the point where there was so much complexity going around, I was actually comfortable with that complexity and understood how to manage all the different pieces of it.

Success with Chris Hummel

Success with Chris Hummel

Tweetables

Irish Italian from Boston, speaks Russian, German last name, lived 7 years in Singapore #Insights @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

From diplomat to business #leader #Insights [Click to Tweet]

Finding fax paper in Kazakhstan at 3am #Insights [Click to Tweet]

Chris Hummel: Hi. My name is Chris Hummel. I am an Irish-Italian from Boston who speaks fluent Russian with a German last name, and lived seven years in Singapore. So go figure where that comes from.

Chris Hummel: But I guess that probably other than starting in a small town outside Boston, with relatively modest means and growing up, playing sports, doing all those kinds of things, I think from a career perspective, the most interesting part is I really started out wanting to be a diplomat. So I was going through the State Department process of how to become a diplomat to ultimately stamp visas and grow up and hopefully someday become an Ambassador.

Chris Hummel: Along the way, I tripped up and fell into this business thing where I started working with some of the biggest tech companies in the world – Apple, AT&T, and then ultimately, Oracle where I landed, my first job was actually in Kazakhstan. So I opened the office in Kazakhstan and literally had to worry about how do I get my email dial up at 3 o’clock in the morning and where do I get fax paper and open an office in a very entrepreneurial environment.  Yet, within a company that, at the time, was only about two-three billion dollars, not the Oracle we know today.

Chris Hummel: But grew that up, expanded that career oracle ASAP for a company that’s now called Unify, actually, just been bought by Atos, and ultimately with Schneider Electric, 30 billion dollar conglomerate, have held a number of sales, marketing, business development, channel operations, those kinds of roles.

Chris Hummel: So I’ve had the fortune of working with businesses that are going up and the fortune, I’d say fortune, of working with businesses that were going down as well. But if you really want to capture it in just a few key numbers, from a marketing perspective or business development perspective, I’ve personally generated programs and executed programs worth several tens of billions of dollars so probably somewhere around 25, 30 billion dollars worth of hard, cold sales opportunities I’ve actually created.

Chris Hummel: Now, from the sales point of view, I’ve probably sold one and a half to two billion in terms of personally, the sales teams that I was leading to kinda generate that. But if you really want to take an interesting look at the numbers from where I go or where I’ve come from, I look at the legacy that I left behind in terms of people.

Chris Hummel: So one of the numbers I like best is I think there are seven chief marketing officers who grew up learning from me. Now, I’m still a relatively young guy but I think that’s a great achievement to have that coaching tree, you would call it in sports, that I’ve been able to generate.

Leadership with Chris Hummel

Leadership with Chris Hummel

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Tweetables

#Evolving the #Leadership #Mindset w/ @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

The #first #step in a #leadership #mindset is #accountability #Insights [Click to Tweet]

#Accountability, #Generosity and #Authenticity with @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

Chris Hummel: Usually, your successes, if you hang on to them too much, will become your failures and your failures, if you really focus on and learn from them can be the platforms for your greatest successes.

Chris Hummel: Now what do I mean by that? It’s when you look at the technology markets that I’ve come from, innovation has been key and innovation often teaches you that what you did yesterday drives you to a point that if you keep doing it too long, you’re actually going to lose. You’re going to start to fall down. And so you have to have that agility to move right, to move left, to sort of not forget where you’ve been, not get rid of the tribal knowledge, not forget the recipe book or the playbook that you have, but to be able to say just because it worked doesn’t mean that I can’t challenge it going forward.

Chris Hummel: When I think about leadership, I look at it as a mindset much more than a title or a position.  You can have a big title. You can have a big business card. But it doesn’t mean you’re a leader. It might mean you’re a manager or administrator.

Chris Hummel: So when I look at what makes a leader to me, the first thing I look at is accountability. You have to be accountable for results. And again, it doesn’t matter from what position you’re coming from, you just have to take accountability for your own actions and very often even for the people around you in your team.

Chris Hummel: The second thing is to be genuine. A leader is somebody who actually is genuine whether they have to be forthright or whether they have to be blunt or whether they have to be a little bit softer, they’re always genuine in trying to do the right thing, in trying to get to the right answer, in trying to bring success for everybody. That’s sort of win, win, win situation.

Chris Hummel: The third, and this was taught to me by a friend of mine, Keith Ferrazzi, was generosity is actually very often the path to success as a leader is to be generous, not demand. Yes, you have to be demanding and set a very high bar but give, coach, offer advice, value. And that will actually show people that they can then reciprocate.

Chris Hummel: Those are the things that are leadership from a point of view that builds relationships that actually drive the business that all of us are in.

Leadership Is A Mindset with Chris Hummel

Leadership Is A Mindset with Chris Hummel

Video Highlights

00:31 -- The Mindset of Leaders

01:31 -- The Path To Success

Tweetables

#Evolving the #Leadership #Mindset w/ @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

The #first #step in a #leadership #mindset is #accountability @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

The #second #step in a #leadership #mindset is being #genuine @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

The #third #step in a #leadership #mindset is being #generous @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

#Accountability, #Generosity and #Authenticity with @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

Chris Hummel: When I think about leadership, I look at it as a mindset much more than a title or a position.  You can have a big title. You can have a big business card. But it doesn’t mean you’re a leader. It might mean you’re a manager or administrator.

Chris Hummel: So when I look at what makes a leader to me, the first thing I look at is accountability. You have to be accountable for results. And again, it doesn’t matter from what position you’re coming from, you just have to take accountability for your own actions and very often even for the people around you in your team.

Chris Hummel: The second thing is to be genuine. A leader is somebody who actually is genuine whether they have to be forthright or whether they have to be blunt or whether they have to be a little bit softer, they’re always genuine in trying to do the right thing, in trying to get to the right answer, in trying to bring success for everybody. That’s sort of win, win, win situation.

Chris Hummel: The third, and this was taught to me by a friend of mine, Keith Ferrazzi, was generosity is actually very often the path to success as a leader is to be generous, not demand. Yes, you have to be demanding and set a very high bar but give, coach, and offer advice, value. And that will actually show people that they can then reciprocate.

Chris Hummel: Those are the things that are leadership from a point of view that builds relationships that actually drive the business that all of us are in.

Making The World Better Through Leadership with Chris Hummel

Making The World Better Through Leadership with Chris Hummel

Video Highlights

00:31 -- Ambitions

01:20 -- Technology Influences The World

Tweetables

The #driving #force of a leader is the #mission #ambitions @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

#Changing the #world #one step at a #time @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

How to #collaborate and move the #economy #society forward @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

How #technology has become the tool for #human #growth @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

Solving human #problems with #technology #worldhunger #curecancer @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

Chris Hummel: There’s no question what drives me is the mission, right? I am ambitious. There’s no question about it. Hopefully, in the most altruistic of ways but in a personal way as well, I wish I had the skill to cure cancer. I wish I could look around the world and solve world hunger and really some of the most important and pressing issues. Unfortunately, for whatever reason, my life has not led me to where I have the skill sets or experience to do those kinds of things.

Chris Hummel: So what I focus on is how we, in our personal lives and in our business lives, are actually going to work; how we’re going to change the way we work together; how we’re going to collaborate; how we’re going to move the economy forward; how we’re going to move our society forward.

Chris Hummel: And so I think where the technology angle has always been so interesting especially to somebody who certainly didn’t start out as a technologist, become so critical is because the technology then allows us to do all these things. It is the tool. It is very often the fuel that allows us to accomplish the things we haven’t been able to do before.

Chris Hummel: And whether that’s an efficiency gain or whether that’s a new capability that we’d never had before. We’re just at I think, at the nascent precipice of how we work together; video conferencing, telephony, all these kinds of things, social media. They’re just starting to work together and really changing our behaviors as human beings. And you want technology sometimes to mimic the way that we naturally communicate and support that.

Chris Hummel: At the same time, you’ve got all this technology that allows for efficiency and transactional improvement and what not, that is allowing us to work at volumes and speeds we’d never been able to work before, add in connectivity and insight from data. There are some really phenomenal forces that are all coming together, fuelled by technology that could take us down a very dangerous path.

Chris Hummel: And I think it’s the job of leaders and thought leaders and influencers to make sure that that path we go down is not the dangerous one but much more towards that optimistic future where we’re now capable of doing so many more things.  And we use that to hopefully find people who are a hell lot smarter than I am to go solve cancer, world hunger, do all those kinds of things that are really far more pressing than whether I made another half a point on my profit or whatever else.

Chris Hummel: But those are the kinds of things that drive me to say, “I have a place. I have a role to play in ushering in this transition to whatever the next thing is.” And to be a part of it, I just think is phenomenal.

Managing Complexity & Achieving Industry Dominance with Chris Hummel

Managing Complexity & Achieving Industry Dominance with Chris Hummel

Video Highlights

00:31 -- First consulting job in Kiev, Ukraine

00:55 -- Comparing to the competition

01:15 -- The Intellect vs. Toolset struggle

01:41 -- Surpassing the competition

02:12 -- A complex edge

02:36 -- A mentor’s advice comes true

Tweetables

The #Practical #MBA And #Life #Experience Are Better #Preparation to #Develop #Leadership @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

Managing From Different #Perspectives To #Maximize #Leadership #Potential And #Market Dominance @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

#Managing Complexity & #Achieving Industry #Dominance with @Hummel_Chris [Click to Tweet]

Chris Hummel: And I remember very early in my career actually when I was just less than a year out of graduate school. I was doing a consulting job off in Kiev, Ukraine with AT&T in one of their joint ventures over there and I met a boss who said to me, she looked at my profile.  And as I mentioned earlier, I came from academic, State Department, diplomatic background and I was really worried. I said, “Look. If I try and get into this business arena, this terrible cut-throat gladiatorial warfare, I didn’t go to Harvard Business School. I didn’t go to Wharton, I didn’t go to Tuck. Am I going to be okay?”

Chris Hummel: And she gave me a great piece of advice that helped me both early in my career and later. And she said, “You will really struggle for the first couple of jobs because you won’t have the tool set. You might have the intellect but you won’t have the actual tool set on how to tackle a lot of these problems you’re going to confront or these challenges or opportunities.”

Chris Hummel: And she said, “And the people from those prestigious business schools, they will have a foundation of tools that they will be able to bring to any situation and they’ll have that credibility of having come from a business school where you will struggle for the first couple of jobs. But once you get to that third job or that fourth job, in particular when you get to management, then you’ll start to wipe the floor with them.” She said, “Because, and not that they’re bad people or your intellect is better but you’ve been trained to think from so many different angles.”

Chris Hummel: So my education was one where we had to look at history, economics, anthropology, finance, law. We had to look at it altogether where it wasn’t down only one discipline and there’s a struggle to be functionally competent which is important. You have to be functionally competent.  But if you can bring all those perspectives together and analyze from a comprehensive point of view, then that’s when particularly you get in this world of ambiguous business problems and challenges and you’re managing people and their personal agendas, and all those kinds of things.

Chris Hummel: That’s when she advised me, I would start to really understand. And she was absolutely right because boy, I struggled at the beginning.  But once I got to the point where there was so much complexity going around, I was actually comfortable with that complexity and understood how to manage all the different pieces of it.

The Importance of Developing Your Competencies with Chris Hummel

The Importance of Developing Your Competencies with Chris Hummel

Video Highlights

00:30 -- Imparting Knowledge

01:37 -- Examples of a microcosm

02:23 -- Mosaic of life

Tweetables

#Imparting #knowledge on the next #generation #Insights @Hummel_Chris [Click To Tweet]

#Building a portfolio of #competencies #Insights @Hummel_Chris [Click To Tweet]

#Life is not a linear #progression, rather a #mosaic of #experiences #Insights @Hummel_Chris [Click To Tweet]

Chris Hummel: So when I look at how I impart knowledge to particularly a much younger generation, I start with my daughter. The oldest of my three children is seven years old. I wish she would listen to my advice more. I wish I had better advice to give her.

Chris Hummel: But I really sit down with her and I say, “How you treat other people doesn’t mean you always have to give in; doesn’t mean you always have to listen to peer pressure.” Obviously, as a parent I’m very conscious of peer pressure. But I say, “How you treat people demonstrates far more about you than it does about those people.”

Chris Hummel: And that’s even when you don’t like people. That’s when they do something wrong to you. She’s a great microcosm. She’s just at that age as she’s gone beyond the infantile emotional reaction to everything and she’s now slowly starting to build relationships and look at the way the world goes.

Chris Hummel: And then the second thing I’m trying to do to her is I say, “Build a portfolio.” I don’t quite use these terms to her obviously. But, “Build a portfolio of competencies. Don’t worry so much about your career or that linear progression of what you do. Think about it as a mosaic.”

Chris Hummel: And so a great example is she sings. She sings all the time. She’s singing whether it’s Taylor Swift or whoever. She’s singing all the time.

Chris Hummel: But then she comes and says, “I don’t want to learn the piano anymore.” And I said, “Well, if you want to be a singer, it’s not just about your voice. Are you able to act, to perform? Are you able to understand music so you could play the piano or the guitar? Are you social enough so that you can understand the feedback and feed off that?”

Chris Hummel: And if you take that little microcosm of my little daughter, I guess you can’t be on the American Idol anymore but who wants to grow up and be a singer, how she does that isn’t a linear path. It’s going to be this mosaic of things that zig and zag all over the place. And hopefully as a parent, I can guide her through that.

Chris Hummel: And as a leader, as a friend, I try and do the same thing with my friends, my employees, my peers, bosses to say that same thing, that linear is great. And yes, there’s a part of life that has to be like that. But revel in, marinade in the joy of this mosaic of experience that’s just completely unique.

Chris Hummel: We talked at the beginning Irish-Italian kid from Boston, speaks fluent Russian, with German last name or what not, who else can go and say that? I’m sure there’s somebody out there. I didn’t plan it that way but it just sort of came that way and I’m very happy that it’s taking me to this point. Hopefully, I can help others do the same thing.